Naan Therapy

Or should it be 'paratha' therapy …

Archive for the ‘Lactose Free’ Category

Quest for a guilt free paratha …

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I have been on a quest for guilt free parathas for many years now. I thought I had it with my pea paratha but I stand corrected. A recent culinary experiment made me realize that an even better filling is edamame. Comparing shelled and frozen edamame to shelled and frozen peas, here is the nutritional breakdown:

Edamame 100 gm

  • Calories 160 kcal
  • Total fat 6.7 gm
  • Total carb 13 gm
  • Dietary fiber 6.7 gm (effective carb = 6.3 gm)
  • Protein 17.3 gm
Peas 100 gm

  • Calories 107 kcal
  • Total fat 6 gm
  • Total carb 20 gm
  • Dietary fiber 4.8 gm (effective carb = 15.2 gm)
  • Protein 4.8 gm

Edamame does bring its characteristic nutty flavor to the paratha. If you have a good hand with rolling the paratha with coarse filling, you can finely chop the thawed kernels and mix with necessary spices. They have lower water content compared to frozen peas and therefore don’t really need any pre-cooking.

Don’t let my culinary excursions make you forget what parathas are supposed to be like. Here is a recent article from Odd Ends discussing ghee fried parathas from Old Delhi’s Parathe wali Gali. Maybe for every year of eating healthy paratha, one can indulge in a bite of the ghee fried one.

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Written by Som

July 31, 2011 at 6:27 pm

Chilke ki roti – Vintage punjabi cuisine

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Chilke (husk) ki roti

This recipe is from my grandmother’s generation that believed in the motto “waste not want not” and uses the husk of lentils to lighten up the traditional roti. Following recipe serves two.

Preparing the lentil: Take a cup of green mung bean (split or whole). Rinse the beans and soak overnight. If using whole beans, prepare for the beans to sprout and let the bean sprout for a day or so which eases removal of husk. When the beans are ready, place the lentils in a large container and fill with water. Gently rub the lentils to loosen the skin. Collect up the skin that floats to the top. Squeeze the skin to drain all water and set aside. If making daal from the washed and de-skinned lentil, click here for one particular recipe. The sprouts can be served as a simple salad when mixed with salt, pepper and lime juice.

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Written by Som

July 6, 2011 at 11:47 am

Black rice pudding

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Black rice pudding with coconut milk and garnished with tapioca pearls, Green Goddess, New Orleans

Black rice pudding with coconut milk and garnished with tapioca pearls, Green Goddess, New Orleans

Yesterday, an energetic re-organization of my pantry reminded me that I have been aging Burmese black rice for at least an year. The rice itself was bought from a local branch of Whole Foods. I had also snagged myself Steen’s Cane Syrup during a recent trip to New Orleans. The two came together in a quick lactose free pudding last evening.

Pressure cook on low 1/4 cup of black rice, a pinch of salt with 2 cups of milk (2% lactose free or almond milk) for 1 hour. Add more milk to achieve desired consistency, add cane syrup to taste, perhaps a few spoonfuls of raisins and nuts and serve at room temperature.

Written by Som

April 7, 2011 at 6:54 am

Open faced toasted sardine sandwich aka sardine tartine

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Sardine tartine

Sardine tartine

This sandwich is an inspiration from our trip to Paris.  Our neighborhood boasted of a wonderful restaurant that served various tartines for lunch. Buttered and toasted open faced Poilâne bread with sardine paste hasn’t been forgotten yet.

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Written by Som

February 13, 2011 at 7:33 pm

Desi style french toast

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Acme bread and egg with coriander, chopped green chillies, and shallots

Acme bread and egg with coriander, chopped green chillies, and shallots

Savory frech toast with Indian spices

Savory frech toast with Indian spices

I grew up eating desi style french toast. If we can improvise to create McAloo Tikki Burger, desi style french toast shouldn’t come as surprise. It is a savory version of the french toast with a touch of desi flavors.

Ingredients (serves 2):

  • 6-7 pieces of sliced baguette (3-4 cm across, 1/2 cm thick). Alternately use country style wheat bread.
  • 2 eggs (cage free, organic etc.)
  • Splash of lactose free 2% milk
  • 1 thai green chilli thinly sliced
  • 1 small shallot finely chopped
  • 2 tsp of coriander minced
  • 1/2 tsp of salt (or to taste)
  • 1/2 tsp sugar (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

Shallots can be replaced with onion. If onion is sharp, soak chopped onion  in cold water for a couple of minutes before adding to eggs. Thai green chili can be replaced by de-seeded jalapeno if necessary. Addition of sugar makes this dish slightly sweet and mostly savory.

Beat the eggs, mix in milk, shallot, chilli pepper, coriander, salt and pepper. Soak 2-3 slices for about 2 minutes. Fry in 2 tsp of neutral oil such as canola and serve with ketchup or chutney.

All the goodness of french toast stays the same – creamy centers if using white bread or the chewiness if using country style wheat bread. The savory aspect of this is healthier. The ketchup adds to the umaminess. Every once in a while you will bite into a sliver of hot green chilli that will light a part of your mouth on fire – very invigorating in the morning. For a perfect breakfast, enjoy with a cup of hot chai.

Written by Som

August 19, 2010 at 7:22 am

Homegrown la ratte potatoes

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Freshly harvested la ratte potatoes

Freshly harvested la ratte potatoes

This year’s potato crop is a bit of a disappointment. We got La Ratte seed potatoes from Seed Savers Exchange but the yield hasn’t been very encouraging. Perhaps the unusually cool weather is the culprit.

Slow cooked la ratte (serves 2-3)

  • 40-50 of the small potatoes (~ 1/2 lb) scrubbed clean but skin on
  • 2 Tbsp of European style unsalted butter
  • Fleur de Sel or other flake salt to taste

Melt butter in an omelette pan. Cover and cook the potatoes on lowest setting for 20-25 minutes. Pick up the potatoes with a slotted spoon and serve hot with sprinkling of salt. Typically, fleur de sel is used in this quintessential french recipe but I didn’t have it handy. The flesh is buttery and nutty. I found the skin a little peppery. Fantastic with a glass of chilled white wine.

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Written by Som

August 13, 2010 at 10:50 pm

Guy Savoy’s Vegetable Gratin

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Vegetable Gratin

Vegetable Gratin

This is a vegetable gratin, similar to Thomas Keller’s ratatouille, except the bottom layer is that of melted onions – a sweeter and less umami version. I found some freshly harvested salad onions (spring onions with big white bulb) at the farmer’s market yesterday but you can use any onion. Thinly slice couple of large onions, toss with 1 Tbsp olive oil, 1 tsp red wine vinegar, a pinch of salt and a pinch of sugar. Let rest while you heat the oven to 400 F. Put the onions in a large enough gratin dish such that the onions form a single layer. Cook for 20-25 minutes, turning the onions every 5 minutes. Let cool. You can fry the onions on stove top as well but I wanted to make a one pot dish.

Cut and layer vegetables (zucchini, eggplant and tomatoes) as in ratatouille dish. Brush top with vinaigrette and scatter thyme leaves. Bake in 250F oven for 1-1.5 hrs. If you are serving fresh made gratin, it is worth the effort to cut the vegetables thinly and brushing the top with olive oil every 30 minutes of baking. This allows the vegetables to become crisp.

Written by Som

August 10, 2010 at 7:29 am